S_V_H Woodstock image 3

•11/05/2020 • Comments Off on S_V_H Woodstock image 3

Woodstock image 3 shows the music in place.   Different from the last work I did widened the music stems which allows me to attach my musical notes, incidentals, ties, and slurs to those stems.  This is consistent with my style before I left my studio for my current home office studio.  The wider stems have the benefit of more glue in contact with the canvas, allowing for a stronger bond.  I realized when moving my last unstretched artwork that any amount of twisting of the canvas can loosen pieces.  Maintaining the attaching of the music to unsupported canvas remains a concern.  These artworks present an uniqueness not seen in art.  Their freedom from a support, that has been a fundamental part of painting for over 500 years,  enhances that.

Next up, I will add all my embellishments for interest.  Finally, I have a decent rendition of the music Woodstock, and since I am not hurried to start another project, I would like to experiment with the instrumentation.  The complicated software I use for the arrangement requires me to switch my concentration away from art to the mechanics of music production.  My ability to process only one artwork at a time, also relates to my arrangements of the music.  That is why I try to complete the music before I build the artwork.  It all comes down to focus and success that moves me from one point to the next, one foot in front of the other, through one door and knocking on the next.

Scott Von Holzen

 

 

S_V_H Woodstock 2nd image

•10/25/2020 • Comments Off on S_V_H Woodstock 2nd image
Woodstock first image

This second image shows the results of the scratch-off technique of the top layer.  I have mixed feelings.  I would have liked the words on the background layer to show better, to connect the viewer to the music.  To accomplish that, I realized I would need to remove too much of the top layer, losing much of the scraped look.   Also, because the words where casually applied their inconsistent look makes identifying them harder.  For comparison, here again is the original background of this artwork.  The words are there.  Whether anyone can find them and then read them only matters to me.   For now, they exist, and their colors show, and at this learning stage of this technique everything is subject to change with next artwork.

Next I will being cutting out 125 pieces of wood for my music stems.  I already cut out my poker chips note heads twice for this work.  The first size was 1 5/8 inches, which were too big.  I will save them for another project.  I returned to the drill press and cut another batch, this time sized at 1 1/2 inches.  They are all sanded and painted brown.  The stems will be stained and then painted.

Scott Von Holzen

S_V_H Woodstock first image & a little J S Bach

•10/22/2020 • Comments Off on S_V_H Woodstock first image & a little J S Bach

This first image of Woodstock shows the painted background for the foundation of my scratch-off technique.   This first step differs in appearance from my last three artworks that also used this style method.   The purpose of the scratching off the top layer of paint is to expose parts of the backgrounds, which creates an unique and unpredictable (not boring) contrast with the music.  I could have chosen any abstract background style, but did not with my past three works.  They shared a style with Where to have all the Flowers Gone.  I changed this trend with Woodstock.  For this artwork, I had an option the others lacked,  lyrics.  Instead of painting a silly nothing image for the background, I painted the lyrics that are part of the music.

This idea of removing paint to expose more than another layer of paint originates with my Bach Menuet.   For that work I glued a copy of Bach’s handwritten music to the background of the canvas and then scraped off the final topcoat to expose the sheet music.   This same idea works with the lyrics from Woodstock.  When revealed the words add color and connection to the music and the artwork.

To paint so many words, I looked first to Jean Michel Basquiat’s handling of words (he used a lot of them in many of his artworks).  Here is an example of his style from Artnet.   He used oil sticks (oil paint in the form of a crayon) to write out his words.  I do not have any oil sticks, so as in the past I brushed in the lyrics with the bar set at legibility.

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I finished the J S Bach work, Prelude, in September.  What I had not completed was the audio and the mount for the artwork. Prelude is the first work that uses the new 20watt amplifier and speaker system, whose construction and configuration took time. It was up and running only after receiving some replacement parts delayed in shipping.  When they arrived, I mounted them on a board I attached to a custom-built aluminum frame that holds the speakers, amplifier and to which I could attach and remove the artwork. Here is my YouTube video of my arrangement of J S Bach Cello Suite No.1 The Prelude mounted on the frame.

Up next I will prep the background so I can apply the top coat of paint, which for this artwork will be Cerulean Blue Deep. Once the final coat dries the fun part (and mess) begins as I will then scrap of the Cerulean to review what is beneath.

S_V_H The Song Woodstock intro

•10/07/2020 • 2 Comments

Joni Mitchell wrote the song: Woodstock,  which will be the subject of the next musical portrait.

By the time I finish an artwork that can take a month or more, I have lost much of my earlier interest and am ready to move on.   Thankful for a break it can take days to find and select the next piece of music to portray.  Then it takes added time to convince myself that the chosen music is worth the effort.  How I work is from project to project:  I focused until I finish an artwork,  and only then do I consider what to do next.

Once I have chosen my next subject, I arrange the music.  That was a lot easier before I added sound.   Without sound or words, what I did was pick a phrase or a sentence from the music as a start point and follow that to an obvious end point.  If the music included words I then had to choose carefully not only the words (Copywrite concerns on my part), but I had to make sure I still had a good start and end point.  Now days with added sound,  I create arrangements.  What that means is I pick short sections from different parts of the music’s notation, change them to connect,  and then together I create a pleasant flow of the music I am portraying.  This takes days with many revisions.  Eventually, I find an arrangement that sounds good to my ear.  I then move on to the artwork, using my arrangement as my guide to building the artwork.

That is where I am at with this first blog entry about the Woodstock project. There is no first image of the artwork (The start date of his project is September 26th).   Instead, I am offering a late revision of the music that I arranged for this artwork and that I will use as my guide to cut out, sand, prime, and paint what will be the notation parts for this project.

This is my current arrangement of the project Woodstock that comes from the music of Joni Mitchell:

In 1970 while in college in Madison the version of Woodstock I knew was by Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. This song was on their album Déjà vu, a favorite album of mine. Their music confirmed my taste preference for the melodic style of Rock music

I discovered my rock n’ roll style when the Beatles came to America, as a sophomore in a rural high school farming town. I was a Beatles rock ‘n roll guy: great melodies and lyrics, at moderate volume, without any distortion. I had little to no interest in the groundbreaking hard rock style of Led Zeppelin. Obviously, my musical tastes expanded in college. I grew to like The Who, buying their album Live at Leedes, and Cream buying their two disc album Wheels of Fire. Still, The Beatles’ influenced continued into the eighties as I favored Madonna and the Funky sound of Prince, instead of Van Halen, whose music hits resurface with the passing of Eddie Van Halen.

Why then did I not arrange the version of Woodstock from my past? It was because recently when I listened to Joni Mitchell’s Folk rockin’ version of Woodstock; it caught my interest. I knew it would be a better fit for my current limited arrangement abilities, and it would be an acknowledgement of my early years appreciation for Folk music. Folk music later paralleled my preference for rock ‘n roll and grew from the likes of Peter, Paul and Mary, to Joni Mitchell, who I often mixed up with another favorite of mine, Judy Collins. I believe the album Déjà vu contains several other songs that are artwork worthy of future projects for the Sixties time in my life. This one is a thank you to Joni Mitchell, and her lyrics about my lasting memory of the Woodstock Rock Festival.

Finally, unrelated to the music, I have a comment about this blog site. Starting early in its existence, I made up a goal to post the same number of letters Vincent Van Gogh wrote to his brother, Theo Van Gogh. That total is a challenging 658. After ten years of blogging, this post will bring me to 637. I am only twenty-one away.

Scott Von Holzen

S_V_H Bach Cello Suite No.1in G Major, the Prélude, BWV 1007 Final Image

•09/21/2020 • 1 Comment

Here is the not-yet-ready for prime-time arrangement of Bach’s Prelude from his first cello suite:

(Audio updated 9-23)

This music sounds better in the software I used to arrange it, which is StudioOne version 5.  The section where the drums come in on the WAV file is dull compare to the original software file.  I am still in the early learning stages of this software.  I will make improvements, and updating this file, over the next few days before installing this stereo system in the artwork.

I am delaying the video for this artwork because I am having technical issues with a new 20 watt stereo system I will use for this artwork.  That is a large upgrade from my previous system which was also stereo but only 2 watt per channel.  By going to a 20 watt amplifier I can use speakers that produce a higher quality of audio reproduction to better match the value of these artworks.

The drums in this music comes from a song In The Air Tonight at the 3 minute 16 seconds mark.

My arrangement of this classic Bach music (even after I have perfected the WAV file) would not appeal to most J S Bach admirers.  I understand that, and they are right, but I am an artist, and if I am to be an artist, you gotta break down barriers, push through, upset, question, and challenge the viewer to see and hear differently, and not necessarily the way I do, just different enough to turn the knob, and step through the next unknown door as a shared experience.

I will have more about this artwork in a future video, including the playing of the final audio file.

Scott Von Holzen

S_V_H Bach Cello Suite No.1in G Major, the Prélude

•09/18/2020 • Comments Off on S_V_H Bach Cello Suite No.1in G Major, the Prélude

Here are the first couple of images of absolutely my last J S Bach artwork for this year.  I painted this work after watching the breakdown of this outstanding classical cello piece.  This is my third Bach work coming out of my temporary studio that is a free canvas based.  Again, as in the other two, I have kept the background mostly white. With this third work, I have limited the range of background colors to three blues to simplify the look of the color.

This is the image of this Prélude with the topcoat and the scratching completed.  I have developed a system to cleanly scratch-off the top acrylic layer of paint to reveal the base layer that is the above first image. The scratching is a lot more extensive than my previous works.  I have done that to push this method forward and to better adhere to wood attachments.  With this third work, I am abandoning my past, and going back to the future, which is working with wood to create a three-dimension look.

Here is a nice video version by Yo Yo Ma of J S Bach’s Cello suite Prélude:

I am not sure how this loose piece of the canvas will hold up to being moved with all the attached wooden pieces.  No matter, for now, this is my direction.

 

 

Scott Von Holzen

S_V_H The 2 Bach Minuets Together

•08/19/2020 • Comments Off on S_V_H The 2 Bach Minuets Together

Bach Minuet in G major

Bach Minuet in B minor

Here are the two finished Bach Minuets together along with the video explaining how these two artworks came about, why they look the way they do, and where I am going with this art

Even I am surprised that up next I have another Bach project, the Prelude from Cello Suite No. 1 in g major BWV 1007.  What caught my attention was this video that does a detailed explanation of this music.  Every song I paint, I research.  I want to know the music’s story and any other influences it has, including covers by other musicians.  Even though I may like the music, I need to build a connection that goes beyond the song in order to spend many weeks of my time to complete a project.  That does not mean the music I paint has to always be the best of the best.  Many times I am attracted to the melody, the lyrics, or my past connection.   As for my next project, the video of this Classical Prelude perked my interest after going through my list of to do artworks of over thirty songs and not connecting to any.

Here is the scrolling sheet music which includes Bachs own hand written version:

For interest, at less for me, here is my good-enough-to start for now,17th version of my 35 second condensed cover of this short 2 minute forty second Bach masterpiece.

 

Let me presume that anyone with a Classical music training will not be kind to my version.   I am an unique portrait painter and the Prelude for J S Bach’s first Cello Suite is my subject, and the music gives the image character and a voice.

 

Scott Von Holzen

S_V_H Bach Minuet in B Minor BWV 1067 Final image

•08/07/2020 • Comments Off on S_V_H Bach Minuet in B Minor BWV 1067 Final image

Length 77″ x 20″ Canvas Size L80″ x 35″ border size 3″ around.

This is the final image of my second Bach Minuet on canvas.   Both Minuet artworks share attributes in size, colors,  design,  and the interesting scratch technique.  This artwork improves on the what the earlier Menuet figured out through trial and errors.  Now for an interesting challenge.  I will not stretch either of these works.   That means I will have issues to solve, including how I will hang these artworks.  Since I have musical arrangements for each of these Minuets, how am I going to attach the speakers, amplifier and switches.  Finally, since this art rarely sells, how will I safely store these artworks?  Hum?

I dropped my interactive, constructive sculpture style because of the move to my current small office studio.  I am not happy painting artworks on canvas, which I see as one-dimensional.  Music is my subject and portraying it works best in three dimensions.  I do not have the option to return to my preferred multi-dimensional art style. That means I have been using shading and contrast to create a fake looking two-dimensional musical artworks on canvas.  To finish these two canvas works, I will add the music, which will take time.   Hopefully, I will use the next few days to figure out how I will keep on keeping on, moving ahead.

Scott Von Holzen

S_V_H Bach Minuet in B Minor on canvas

•07/28/2020 • Comments Off on S_V_H Bach Minuet in B Minor on canvas

My next project is another version of the Bach Menuet, BWV 1067 that I recently completed.  This artwork on canvas is a followup companion piece to the Bach Menuet in G Major canvas project. The title of this 2nd Menuet version is Bach Minuet in B Minor.  The image above shows my base image.  It would not matter how I paint these types of backgrounds, because they disappear after I apply the top coat.  Turning around as I am writing this blog and looking at this canvas, I like what I see.  Seventy-five-years ago this would have been an interesting abstract work.  Today, these backgrounds are enjoyable and interesting practice.

 

Scott Von Holzen

S_V_H J S Bach Minuet in G Major BWV Anh. 114 Final visual image

•07/26/2020 • Comments Off on S_V_H J S Bach Minuet in G Major BWV Anh. 114 Final visual image

This Bach Minuet visually is complete.  I still have to mount the music, square out the canvas, do something with the edges of the canvas, and create a mounting system so I can hang this artwork.  When those steps are complete than I will sign the finish date on the back.  For now, I am putting this project aside to start its companion piece, another Bach Minuet.   When I finished installing the music on these two pieces that will be, for now, the last of my Bach projects.  I am all Bached out.   Any future Classical Music works I will turn first to my favorites, Vivaldi or Mozart.

Until then here is my current arrangement of my the unfinished music for this project, Bach Minuet in G Major:

As for this style of art, I feel it differs to such an extant from this year’s previous artworks, that in a way they seem more like vacation projects.  Except although my vacation home may be on the lake,  it is a fishing lake and I don’t fish, and there’s no air conditioning.   So it goes.  It always does.  It always will.

 

Scott Von Holzen